Winter Glogg

Glogg is a traditional Scandinavian spiced mulled wine that simmers on the stove top to develop its deep complexity. It's the perfect winter warmer and makes for a festive (and easy to prepare!) drink to serve at holiday parties. 

Bull in China Glogg

VINTER GLOGG by Bull in China
Serves 10-12

Ingredients:
2 cups aquavit (we used House Spirits Krogstad Aquavit)
1 750ml bottle light bodied red wine (we used Oregon Pinot noir)
1 750ml bottle red vermouth (we used Hammer & Tongs L’Afrique)
1 cup Pedro Ximenez Sherry
2 cups water
1 orange (thinly sliced into circles)
1 lemon (zest only)
4 cardamom pods (lightly toasted & crushed)
1 cinnamon stick (lightly toasted & crushed)
6 cloves (lightly toasted)
1/2 cup sliced almonds (lightly toasted)
1 tablespoon ginger (peeled & sliced thin)
1 tablespoon rose hips
1 rosemary sprig
6 thyme sprigs
1 cup cane sugar (add more or less to accommodate your personal taste)

Directions:
The day before your party, heat all ingredients except Aquavit and cane sugar in a non-reactive pot until boiling. Reduce heat and let simmer for 10-20 minutes. Remove the mixture from heat, let cool, cover and refrigerate for at least 12 hours. This will allow all flavors time to infuse and concentrate. 

Next, when it’s time to reheat and serve, pour the mixture through a fine mesh strainer and cheese cloth to remove solids. Place mixture back into non-reactive pot with Aquavit and sugar, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and stir mixture until sugar is completely dissolved. Keep Glogg warm on your stove top and ladle out in to heat-resistant glass mugs for your guests. Garnish each glass with a cinnamon stick or an orange wedge pierced with clove (see photo).

Cheers!

Cocktail Tips & Techniques P. 2: Shaken

This week, we're sharing our shaken cocktail tips from our class during Feast Portland at the Multnomah Whiskey Library.

Shaken Cocktail Tips from co-founder Lucas Plant

  1. Shaking a cocktail should be done vigorously. It will aerate, dilute, and incorporate all ingredients. Try a 10 second standard shake, or shaking until your tins get frosty on the exterior.

  2. A good rule of thumb is shake when you have citrus and egg white in your cocktail. Save spirit forward cocktails for stirring.    

  3. Fill your 18 oz tin to the top with ice. Note: We recommend against using a pint glass when shaking because of breakage. Try these 18 oz and 28 oz tins.

  4. Make sure you have an adequate seal on your tins so they don’t break open mid-shake. Then, when unlocking the seal, gently squeeze one side to release.

  5. You might see recipes call for double straining. This is when you strain your shaken cocktail through a hawthorne and fine mesh strainer. Double strain when you want to remove ice chips and any excess pulp from your cocktail. We find that this tends to be a personal preference, so experiment on your own to see what you like.

Put these tips to work by shaking up one of the most iconic drinks of all time: the daiquiri. 

Photo by Carly Diaz

Photo by Carly Diaz

Daiquiri by Lucas Plant, Bull in China

  • 2 oz Silver Rum (we used Ron Cartavio)
  • .75 oz fresh lime juice
  • .50 2:1 cane syrup
  • Barspoon of Lazaronni Amaretto

Add all ingredients into a shaker tin. Add ice and shake for 10-15 seconds. Strain into a chilled coupe and enjoy! 

Cocktail Tips & Techniques P. 1: Stirring

This past week was Feast Portland, and we had the pleasure of hosting hands-on class at the Multnomah Whiskey Library with their head of curation, Jordan Felix. The class covered cocktail technique, focusing on three different stations: Built (think juleps), Shaken and Stirred.

Now that Feast is over, we wanted to share some of our class tips and recipes with you all. First up: Stirred.

Stirring Tips from Bull in China co-founder, Daniel Osborne

1.    In general, stirring as a technique is put in to practice when a specific drink consists of ingredients that are all spirit. It allows for more care to be taken to achieve the gentle balance of correct temperature and dilution. 

2.    There is no right or wrong bar spoon. Find the design that is the most comfortable for you personally. You can check out a variety of options that we sell on our website here.

3.    Always stir clockwise with your right hand, and counter-clockwise with your left hand. This allows for a more fluid and graceful movement.

4.    Fill your mixing glass with as much ice as possible, without it shooting out of the glass while stirring. More ice = more chill. Also, this will ensure your julep strainer has something substantial to rest on while straining your cocktail.

5.    Much like how different types and cuts of meat cook differently, and the ovens, grills, pots or pans play a roll in the desired outcome in cooking, so is the same with cocktail ingredients and the quality of ice you use. 

Put these tips to practice and stir up Daniel's Manhattan twist. 

Photo by Carly Diaz

Hard Bargain by Daniel Osborne, Bull in China

  • 2 oz Buffalo Trace Bourbon 
  • 1 oz L'Afrique Vermouth
  • 2 Dashes Aromatic Bitters (we love Portland Bitters Project)

Add ingredients into a mixing glass, and add ice. Stir for 10-15 seconds and strain into a chilled rocks or coupe. Garnish with an orange peel.

 

New Product: Introducing the Stock Top by Bull in China

We designed this one piece stainless steel dasher top to fit the essential bitters bottles in your line up. Made of finished stainless steel with food grade "o" rings, the BIC Stock Top provides a consistent volume per dash and offers efficiency and comfort when using behind any bar.

Fits on 5 oz, 6 oz or 10 oz Woozy Bottles. Designed by bartenders. Proudly made in Portland Oregon.

Watch it in action and pre-order them TODAY! First shipment will be ready by October 26.

Weekend Recipe: Malt Whitman

This one comes from bartender Ryan Kennedy of Cook & Brown Public House in Providence, RI and will ease you right into fall. He calls this Manhattan variation the "Malt Whitman," swapping the traditional sweet vermouth for maple syrup and maraschino for cherry herring. 

Malt Whitman

From Ryan Kennedy, Cook & Brown

Ingredients:

2 1/2 oz Four Roses Yellow Label
1/2 oz Cherry Heering
2 dashes Fee Black Walnut Bitters
Bar spoon of maple syrup
Orange peel garnish

Tools: 

BIC Mixing Glass
Knob Spoon
Julep Strainer
Rocks glass or coupe

Directions: 

Combine all ingredients into a chilled BIC mixing glass, add ice and stir well. Strain and serve on the rocks or up. Cut orange peel and zest oils over the top of the drink, then use it for garnish. Enjoy! 

Weekend Cocktail Recipe: Reverse Birthday

We are basking in some late summer sun here in Portland, so we thought we'd share a recipe featuring one of our favorite ingredients of the season: Starvation Alley Cranberry Juice.

Starvation Alley is Washington's FIRST organic cranberry farm located on the Long Beach Peninsula. In addition to producing gorgeous plump cranberries, they also make the most delicious mouth-puckering cold-pressed juice. It's far from your average cranberry juice—there's no sugar added, so it packs a healthy punch—and happens to be an excellent cocktail ingredient.

This cocktail was created by our co-founder Daniel Osborne, who was inspired by the Americano when dreaming up his Oregon-centric twist.

IMG_1788.PNG

Reverse Birthday
From Bull in China's Daniel Osborne

Ingredients:

3/4 oz New Deal Gin
3/4 oz Cappelletti
3/4 oz Lustau Fino Sherry
3/4 oz of Starvation Alley Cranberry
Soda Water
Orange

Tools:

BIC Mixing Glass
Knob Spoon
Julep Strainer
Collins glass

Directions: 

Pour all ingredients into a BIC mixing glass with ice and stir well. Strain into an ice-filled Collins glass, then top with soda water. Cut an orange peel and zest it over the top of the drink, place peel in your cocktail as the garnish. Now, go outside and enjoy!

Weekend Recipe: Multnomah Whiskey Library

Today, we begin our new Friday column "Weekend Recipe" where we tap one of our wonderfully talented Bull in China Bartenders to share their favorite stirred cocktail of the moment.

This one is from Michael Lorberbaumor of the Multnomah Whiskey Library in Portland, Oregon. It's his balanced twist of our all-time favorite cocktails, the Boulvardier.

The Detour

From Michael Lorberbaumor, Multnomah Whiskey Library

Ingredients: 

1.5 oz Angels Envy Bourbon
.75 oz Alfonso Oloroso Sherry
.5 oz Cynar
.25 Gran Classico
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Tools: 

Bull in China Mixing Glass
Barspoon
Jiggers
Julep Strainer
BIC Rocks Glass

Directions: 

Combine all ingredients into a BIC mixing glass filled with ice and stir well. Strain into BIC rocks glass over a big cube. Cut a thin orange peel and zest it over the top of the cocktail, then discard.

Enjoy!

Bull in China Featured in The Oregonian Sunday Edition

This year, we've partnered with the incredible team at Bollywood Theater to create signature cocktails to complement their menu. This story by Colin Powers in the Oregonian perfectly illustrates how we worked together and developed signature cocktails that hinted at the Indian flavors of Bollywood, while not overpowering their big, bold flavors. To read the entire story, visit Oregonlive.com or click here.

Oregonian A&E with Bull in China

Behind the Glass

Things are cranking away over here at BIC HQ as we prepare for Tales of the Cocktail. In case you're not familiar with Tales of the Cocktail (TOTC or Tales as we like to call it), it's the largest cocktail industry showcase in the country that brings together the most important movers and shakers of the booze world. To say that we're excited to go is an understatement. This is a huge opportunity for our little company and we are so honored to showcase our wares during the Meet the Makers series. During our talk, Luke and Daniel will take the stage to share our journey—from a big idea to actualizing our dream. 

In honor of the Meet the Makers series, we want to highlight the incredible makers who we have partnered with to manufacture our products, all by hand in Portland, Oregon.

Below are a few shots from Elements Glass, the amazing team who blows our signature Bull in China mixing glass. 

Meet Aaron Frankel of Elements Glass, our incredible glass manufacturer based in Northwest Portland.

Meet Aaron Frankel of Elements Glass, our incredible glass manufacturer based in Northwest Portland.

First up is Aaron Frankel of Elements Glass at his Northwest Portland studio. Aaron and his team have been instrumental in the production and development of our BIC mixing glasses. Not to mention, they are some of the coolest and most talented people we've ever met or worked with. Elements is the largest glass blowing facility in Portland, but don't let that fool you. Everything here is made by hand, not by machine, and Aaron and his business partner Ian are mentors and teachers to a fast growing community of aspiring glass artists in the Pacific Northwest.